www.000webhost.com
Amazing Book Store
Product Image

Book Name: The Bunker

Author: James P. O'Donnell

$ 13.54


  • Fast Delivery

  • Secure Payment

  • +61 414 079 535
Overall Rating: (4.78/5) View all reviews (total 9 reviews)
Description

"A powerfully vivid documentary reconstruction of Adolf Hitler's final days." --New York Times"A riveting, damned near incredible (but true) story." --Gerald Green, author of Holocaust"A spellbinding journey." --Washington Post

Reviews

A Look Inside The Last Hole of the Third Reich

by Andrew Wyllie "History Buff"
(5/5)

This book is a look inside the bunker on the last months of the life of the Third Reich. It gives stories taken from interviews of the surviving members of the group that lived in or visited the bunker in those days. It focuses on both the major and minor players in the drama around Hitler's last days.The author describes his visit to the bunker at the close of the Second World War and describes what the bunker looked like at that point before going back to start his narrative of the things that happened there during the previous months. He has spent years tracking down the survivors and getting their stories. There were several stories which were completely new to me and really added to my enjoyment of the book.I would recommend this book to anyone interested in the last days of the Reich along with anyone who is interested in the Hitler court since it shows the personalities which surrounded Hitler in his final days.


Inside The Snakepit

by Bill Slocum
(5/5)

Adolph Hitler wasn't one for back-up plans. When he failed in his mad bid to conquer the world, he allowed himself to be consumed by the flames of his evil folly. "The Bunker" is an absorbing account of Hitler's last days as furnished by those who shared it with him in his Fuhrerbunker.The first thing James O'Donnell gets across to you is the size of the bunker, little more than a reinforced concrete basement. No one but Hitler, it seemed, wanted to be there. O'Donnell himself visited the bunker just over two months after Hitler's death, as he writes in the prologue, and was struck by its cramped nature."Hitler and [Nazi architect Albert] Speer both saw themselves as modern men, freed from superstition," O'Donnell writes. "And so they planned their heaven-defying buildings of the future - the monster Berlin dome seven times the diameter of St. Peter's. Now they were standing in a room that measured ten by fifteen feet."O'Donnell notes at the outset that this is a book of journalism, not archival research, its focus on eyewitness accounts. Speer gave O'Donnell the most interviews, and figures prominently in "The Bunker" in a way that comes off a bit self-serving, countermanding Hitler's "scorched-earth" orders for the preservation of postwar Germany. At one point, O'Donnell presents him contemplating gassing Hitler in order to end the war earlier. O'Donnell gives this big play, numbering it among the major assassination attempts against Hitler even if it never got beyond one man's ruminations.Beyond this "The Bunker" remains a masterpiece of reconstructive narrative, capturing various people living at a high pitch with remarkable lucidity and a cold, deft wit. At times O'Donnell pulls up quotes from various historical figures to give context to the events and people in Hitler's narrowed world. "When Edmund Burke remarked that 'ambition can creep as well as crawl,' he was thinking of Robespierre, but he could have been describing Martin Bormann, out of the womb of time.""The Bunker" was published in 1978 and lacks some of the information made available after the fall of the Berlin Wall. The advantage of the book is O'Donnell's ability to draw on the living memories of Hitler's last intimates, from a 90-year-old ex-general to a young switchboard operator who is, as of this writing, the last living witness to Hitler's demise.O'Donnell draws on these accounts for the body of his narrative, though intervening for some detective work, too. Sometimes, like with Speer, he lets his imagination get away from him. He speculates about the possibility an Allied spy got access to Hitler's inner circle by sleeping with Eva Braun's brother-in-law, a story that has not gained any currency in the last 30 years. Most of the time he appears bang-on, though. Bormann's death (did he really die in Berlin or escape to South America?) was a subject of speculation for years after "The Bunker's" publication, but "The Bunker" account of that death would be borne out by later discoveries.What is it about the Bunker story that draws us in still, with movies, books, even satirical YouTube videos? Is it the absolute finality of what its protagonists faced? Is it schadenfreude given who they were?I think its pull comes back to the idea of life under extreme pressure, which "The Bunker" relates in drip-by-drip detail. "The human emotional system can take just so much duress and then it snaps," a doctor who was there tells O'Donnell. The tension of "The Bunker" makes for an absorbing read that was hard for me to put down, and stayed with me long after I finally did.


The definitive book on the Fuhrerbunker

by J. Michael
(5/5)

"The Bunker" is simply the most detailed and fascinating account of the events in the Berlin Fuhrerbunker I've yet read. Written in 1978, long after the last witnesses were released from Soviet captivity, O'Donnell managed to interview almost all of the surviving actors from the Bunker tragedy. The only people he didn't meet were Johann Rattenhuber, who died in 1966, and Johanna Wolf, who never told anyone anything because she considered it a private secretary's duty to remain private. However, he spoke extensively with all the rest of the surviving people who witnessed Hitler's last days with their own eyes: Speer, Bauer, Guensche, Misch, Mohnke, Axmann, Schenk, Junge, et al. With this wealth of primary sources, their experiences are almost palpable as O'Donnell brings you down into the bunker for Hitler's last days and out onto the streets of burning Berlin for the final breakout. Though I've never read Joachim Fest's "Inside Hitler's Bunker" (which, because it was only published in 2002, after most of the witnesses were dead, I can't imagine has much new information to offer), O'Donnell's "The Bunker" is at least far superior to Trevor-Roper's revered history. I believe it is the best book written on the subject.I really can't understand the criticisms of this book. So-called "academic" historians chide its "journalistic" approach, a term which means- I suppose- that O'Donnell actually spoke to witnesses and did original research as opposed to writing a book based completely on other historians' previously published works. Such incestuous shuffling and borrowing is actually considered a virtue in the rarified world of the court-historians' guild, where a historian's worth is judged solely by the length of his bibliography and the depth of his conformity to establishment opinion. I'll take the "journalistic" approach any day, thank you very much. David Irving earned the scorn of the court historians for much the same reason- his industriousness in digging up previously un-discovered or ignored witnesses and documents. Even though O'Donnell had a bone to pick with Irving, they both embarrassed the historians of WWII who never stepped foot out of their library and whose "research" amounted to mere regurgitation.Similarly, I really don't understand some of the objections put forth by lay reviewers on amazon and elsewhere. It's doubtful whether some of them even read the book. For instance, O'Donnell never speculated on Bormann's survival; he stated flat-out that his body was found and positively identified. He also never said that Bauer had orders to fly Hitler to Asia, but did verify that it was technically possible. I'm also confused at these reviewers' objections to O'Donnell's account of Speer's assassination plans. O'Donnell devotes a mere 5 or 6 pages to Speer's admittedly unverifiable, but historically significant, plan to assassinate Hitler. It would have been negligent to have omitted such a claim. As for "Mata O'Hara", the fact is that there_was_a leak in the Hitler court. The Germans confirm it and the British confirm it. O'Donnell speculates that "Das Leck" was Fegelein's mistress, but he doesn't pretend that his theory is the final word. Who_are_these naysayers and what have they been smoking? It's standard practice that criticism should be based on fact. Until someone proves otherwise, this is the definitive book on the Bunker.


One of the Must Reads on the Topic

by John G. Hilliard
(5/5)

I was a bit concerned when I first picked up this book, thinking that it may be dry with tails of generals looking at maps for days on end. The book is nothing like that, and I was very pleased with this book. It flows very well and is full of very interesting facts (some almost gossip). He also covers all the other major people in the bunker with a good amount of detail. There are very good descriptions of the actual surrounding and very detailed maps and diagrams. I also liked the details of the escape groups after Hitler dies, very interesting. Some details in this book have been stated differently in other books, but all in all a very good effort. I would also recommend "The Last Days of Hitler" by Hugh Trevor-Roper.


Readable & Compelling

by K.A.Goldberg
(5/5)

Author/Journalist James P. O'Donnell (1917-1990) provides a compelling look at the last days of Adolph Hitler and his entourage from their underground bunker in Berlin. Readers learn not only of the mad maniac in his bunker during the final weeks of World War II, but also of his advisors, secretaries, generals, and others sharing his quarters. Temporarily safe beneath reinforced concrete Hitler continued to rule (but with less and less control) as the Battle of Berlin raged on, the Russians closed in, and the U.S. and British air forces pounded from above. O'Donnell shows that Hitler was riddled with drugs, suffering from the shakes, and increasingly detached from reality. More than once he ordered non-existing (or destroyed) divisions into position to oppose the approaching Allied armies. We see that he retained his evil cruelty, ordering executions for more than one that displeased him. We also learn about armaments minister Albert Speer, propaganda chief Joseph Goebbels, confidant Martin Borrman, and other top associates. The story had more than one or two palace intrigues, jealousies, personality clashes and power struggles among associates, and desires to escape or surrender to the Anglo-Americans (instead of the Soviets). Readers may experience feelings of disgust as they read of these sordid characters scurrying about at the nerve center of one of history's worst nightmares.James P. O'Donnell was a soldier, journalist, and in July, 1945, the first American to enter Hitler's captured bunker. Three decades later O'Donnell interviewed many survivors (including Speer) to piece together the story of tyranny collapsing admidst utter destruction, paranoia, and much enduring loyalty to madness. Readers should question the survivors stories as they probably wished to make themselves look better than they were - for example, did Speer really try to assassinate Hitler with poison gas? Still, the author makes it come alive with gripping, readable prose.Note: Readers may want to check the 2004 movie Downfall.


Nazi rats caught in the final trap.

by Miles D. Moore
(5/5)

A combination of crusading reporter, dogged detective and enlightened historian, James P. O'Donnell tracked down all the surviving denizens of the Fuehrerbunker to provide an exciting, minutely detailed portrait of the collapse of the Third Reich and the final madness and suicide of Hitler. It is to O'Donnell's credit that the narrative doesn't end with Hitler's death, but continues in its final third to describe the hideous blood-madness of Joseph and Magda Goebbels, who slaughtered their six children before ending their own lives; to trace the real fate of Martin Bormann; and to detail the desperate (and only partly successful) attempts of Hitler's surviving minions to escape capture, rape and torture at the hands of the Red Army. These stories are just as fascinating as those of the Fuehrer himself. There are amazing stories within the story, such as that of "Mata O'Hara," the glamorous Irish spy (whose true identity is still unknown) who learned the Fuehrer's deepest secrets through becoming the mistress of SS General Fegelein, Eva Braun's drunken, cowardly brother-in-law. The great virtue of this book--and why it makes such addictive, suspenseful reading--is that O'Donnell never forgets these people, even Hitler, are human beings, however great his horror at the unimaginable evils they perpetrated. Perhaps he goes too easy on some of them, particularly Albert Speer. But he actually makes us care about their fates, and above all he reminds us that because it was human beings who committed these atrocities, we are not safe from their kind in the future, or even from becoming their kind. I don't understand why this book has become so obscure. It's true that, because he wrote in 1978, O'Donnell couldn't benefit from the revelations about Red Army investigations and the fate of Hitler's corpse that came out after the collapse of the Soviet Union. But the book still offers many valuable insights into the final days of the Nazi high command, as well as simply being a smashing good read.


Interesting but leaves you wondering....

by Nelson Aspen "Author/Journalist"
(3/5)

From all I have learned, THE BUNKER seems to rely heavily on conjecture and dramatization--the information is almost TOO meticulous. In spite of that, it reminds very interesting reading most of the way. History buffs will not be disappointed by the read, although it should not be considered the definitive resource on Hitler's bunker life.


A Fascinating Descent into Madness....

by odanny
(5/5)

The copy I just finished is the original 1978 hardcover, and James O'Donnell obviously did his homework. He interviewed nearly every survivng member of the bunker, which is suprisingly almost all of them, most after their return from Russian captivity in 1955, with the exception of three Generals committing suicide, and, of course, Hitler and Eva Braun.O'Donnell was a Signal Corps captain, and one of the first Americans to enter the bunker in July of 1945. His sleuth style of research, combined with exhaustive interviews of Hitlers inner circle have allowed him to re-create for the reader almost exactly what happened in the last two weeks of April 1945. All the major players are described in detail, and every personality type is present in this underground fortress, with its gasproof design, cast iron doors and two seperate levels. You will feel the desperation of these committed and loyal Nazis as the ring around Berlin tightens, and their chances for escape dwindle.O'Donnell covers the most intimate details behind not only the final days, but how each member gained their position of influence, who despised whom, Hitlers manic episodes and his heavy sedation, and the small fish in this pond are not overlooked either, down to the enlisted men who kept the generators running and the switchboard operating, and even these seemingly routine operations were not without interference from some members of the group (For example, Martin Bormann had all calls routed through his phone before Hitler got any calls, and Walter Hewell, one of the more intelligent and rational members of the group, would answer the calls from Foreign Minister Von Ribbentrop, because Von Ribbentrop knew Hitler would not speak with him directly. He did NOT know that Hewell would mock him while Hitler stood shoulder to shoulder, and delighted in this with uproarious laughter.)The breakout from the bunker is also covered, with the author reviewing the route in detail. He also describes, from interviewing the survivors, the initial days after capture, and how some fared in Soviet captivity. A must read for those interested in the fiery end of the worlds most diabolical regime.


Fascinating, Carefully-Researched, Unforgettable

by Todd and In Charge
(5/5)

I haven't seen the movie, but my father gave me an old, pre-film copy of this book, which I have not been able to get out of my mind. Not only is this incredibly researched, with copious, original interviews and substantive document analysis, Mr. O'Donnell is an gifted writer with a keen feel for observation and mood.The last days of Hilter's Reich come chillingly alive, as Adolf descends into the bunker below Berlin for the very last time. Images and passages are unforgettable, and ominous -- Speer's abandoned plot to poison Hitler through the vent shaft; Magda Goebbels bringing her six children into the bunker, with the impending promise of certain death; Hitler kissing Eva on the lips at a staff meeting in the very last moments, as bombs and air raid sirens signal the end.Impossible to put down, this is a must-read for any WWII buff.


Best Sellers
Product Image

Paul Newman: A Lif

(4.3/5)

$9.99

Product Image

The Red Tent: A No

(4.2/5)

$8.99

Product Image

Washington's Cross

(4.7/5)

$5.37

Product Image

Dog Company: The B

(4.3/5)

$10.79

Product Image

Dearie: The Remark

(4.3/5)

$9.99

Product Image

Give Me Tomorrow

(4.7/5)

$9.99

User who like this book also like